15 things you always wanted to know about breastfeeding!

You thought you knew everything about breastfeeding? But did you know the following 15 facts?

  1. Breast size is not important! No matter what size you are, you’ll make enough milk for your baby.
     
  2. Babies breastfeed until they’re full not until they ’empty’ your breast, on average, babies remove 67% of the milk you have available.
     
  3. An average breastfeed lasts 16 minutes.
     
  4. Breastfeeding burns an average of 500 calories a day.
     
  5. The average time it takes for letdown to happen is 56 seconds.
     
  6. Typically you can expect growth spurts when your baby is about two to three weeks, six weeks and three months. If you continue to feed on demand for a couple of days this phase will pass and the balance between supply and demand will be restored.
     
  7. After six weeks it is normal for breastfeeding babies not to poo for 3-7 days as the milk is easily digested and tailor made that there is very little waste product.
     
  8. When your baby is born his stomach is the size of a marble, so the colostrum you produce will be just the right amount to fill him!
     
  9. Babies naturally nurse in 2 phases – Initially they suck fast and light to stimulate milk and then slower and deeper once the milk is there.
     
  10. Breastmilk contains 415 different proteins.
     
  11. Stem cells exist in breastmilk! These amazing cells have the ability to become a load of different type of cells in the body. Stem cells are like gold dust to medical research.
     
  12. Breastmilk leaves the breast through openings in the nipple; the average amount of openings in a nipple is 9, with some ladies having up to 18!
     
  13. When breasts lactate they are classed as an organ!
     
  14. Almost three-quarters of mums produce more milk with their right breast.
     
  15. When breastfeeding Babies get Breastmilk is the ultimate all-in-one meal and, amazingly, your body produces the right nutrients and volume of milk to match your baby’s needs and developmental stage.